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YOUR FAMILY AND YOU

family

If you are assessed as being under some degree of threat, always ask yourself:

  1. Am I following a set routine in my lifestyle?
  2. At what point can I be most vulnerable to attack?

It is important to recognise vulnerable situations and to try to avoid them. There will be some things that you simply can't avoid like leaving your home, arriving at your place of work, traveling along the same route on a daily/weekly basis. visiting the same place of worship at the same time, collecting family members from regular social or sporting activities, visiting your family home on a regular or predictable basis or eating at a restaurant/hotel on a regular basis. At these times you must be extra vigilant and on 'red alert'. As we tend to be creators of habits, each reader must look at his/her lifestyle and family activities to identify his/her own predictable patterns that can create increased vulnerabilities for attack.

IT IS ADVISABLE THAT YOU:

  • Look out for suspicious or unusual behaviour by people around you especially close to your home or other places where you regularly attend;
  • Be alert to possible threats arising from public or private engagements you are involved in and inform those among your associates, family and if applicable, staff who may need to be aware of your situation;
  • Try not to create or establish an observable pattern of behaviour which would enable a potential adversary to predict your future movements and construct a plan of attack around them; trap you in situations where you are least able to protect yourself; and isolate you from immediate assistance;
  • If you are granting an interview or meeting someone you do not know well (on a private or personal basis) ensure you meet at a recognised and secure workplace during normal working hours;
  • Avoid details of your public or domestic life becoming known to those that do not need to know. This could be by means of conversation, public directories, social directories and internet activities;
  • Avoid using your professional titles i.e. Justice, My Lord, Director etc. when booking flights/holidays; paying utility bills; paying mobile telephone bills; operating bank accounts and conducting other routine everyday activities;
  • Try not to work or stay overnight in situations that may isolate you from what you regard as places of safety.

YOU SHOULD ASK FOR ASSISTANCE FROM YOUR DIVISIONAL POLICE OFFICER IF

  • You spot any suspicious or unusual activity near your home, workplace, or other regular and predictable location;
  • If your home, car or office shows any signs of unexpected entry or being tampered with;
  • If you believe that an event or activity you are planning to attend may carry particular security risks and may leave you vulnerable to attack.

YOUR CHILDREN

  • It is important to get your children to practice basic security measures without causing them unnecessary worry or creating a sense that your home is a target.
  • Keep young children within sight and earshot, or in the care of a trustworthy adult who ls aware of the special risks your children may be under and who knows what precautions to take


  • Tell your children to:
  • Check that they know any caller prior to opening a door to your home, otherwise do not open the door;
  • Only invite others children they have known for some considerable period of time to your home. If in doubt ask their parents;
  • Walk in groups or pairs and only use well lit streets and main roads when not supervised by an adult.
  • In all circumstances, call their parents for confirmation before opening the door for any visitor or carrying out any errand for any visitor in the absence oftheir parents.

Discourage your children from:

  • Opening parcels delivered to your home in your absence
  • Answering telephones (especially younger children who may unwittingly disclose family details);
  • Disclosing details of your role, movements (e.g. family gatherings status or functions) or address whilst using social network sites. You should discourage them from posting family photographs on social media and from accepting invitations to connect from strangers. If they do post photographs you should encourage them to adjust the safety settings so that photographs are only shared with friends or family. Safety settings on popular social media sites allow users to limit the default privacy posts (especially for users under 18). These privacy settings also allow you to limit who can access your information with your email address This will prevent children unintentionally giving out information which may be harmful to you or your family or indeed receiving malicious or unwanted communications.

Ensure that:

  • Schools contact you/spouse before allowing someone else to collect your child(ren).
  • Any baby-sitter employed is reliable and well acquainted with securit, arrangements at your home. They must also be aware of what action to take to raise an alarm if necessary.

 

 

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